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Jul 192013

vslSampleThe Very Simple * Libs pages have been updated, merging the information into less pages and adding a few relevant updates. The lib is now compatible with Assimp 3.0, and a bug which appeared with recent nvidia drivers when using multiple shaders with uniform blocks has been fixed.

The sample code has been updated to reflect these changes and a Visual Studio 2012 project is included.

Oct 152012

Shaderific is a great iOS application for OpenGL ES shader learning. The app provides the source code for the vertex and fragment shaders for 18 built-in demo shaders, and it allows the creation of new ones. Many 3D objects (including the required teapot) are available, and material and lighting can also be set. There is a free version that lets us try it out, but the changes are not kept once the app is closed.

Oct 102012

This course is the next installment in the established series of SIGGRAPH courses on real-time rendering. It presents the best graphics practices and research from the game-development community and provides practical and production-proven algorithms. The focus of the course is on the intersection between the game-development community and state-of-the-art 3D graphics research, and the potential for cross-pollination of knowledge in future games and other interactive applications.

Slides are available in here.

Dec 052011

Shaders are the core of the rendering process. OpenGL core profile requires us to provide our own shaders, no more fixed function.

Using shaders means more flexibility, but it also implies more work. This is where this lib steps in.

VSShaderLib was designed to make our life easier. It allows to create programs, load shaders from files, associate vertex attribute names with locations, and work with uniforms, including uniforms in named blocks. It also provides access to the info logs.

Jun 032011

A Siggraph 2010 course

“There are strong indications that the future of interactive graphics programming is a model more flexible than today’s OpenGL/Direct3D pipelines. As such, graphics developers need to have a basic understanding of how to combine emerging parallel programming techniques and more flexible graphics processors with the traditional interactive rendering pipeline. The first half of the course introduces attendees to modern parallel graphics architectures and parallel programming models, and describes current and near-term use of these new capabilities for real-time rendering. The second half of the course looks farther ahead at trends emerging in the academic literature and offline rendering communities as researchers use these many-core parallel architectures to explore future rendering pipelines. Topics include future, and more flexible, rendering pipelines that support true motion blur, depth-of-field, curved surfaces, and complex dynamic lighting. The course concludes with a panel, moderated by the creator of OpenGL Kurt Akeley, on the role of fixed function hardware in future graphics architectures.”

Slides available in here.